MPAA Getting in the way of Net Neutrality?

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Despite there being dozens of perfectly fine business models with respect to music and movie distribution, most of them untried by the music and movie industries, the MPAA persists with the notion that they must have all ISPs police content use by individuals.

Net neutrality laws, [MPAA head Dan Glickman] said, “would impair the ability of broadband providers to address the serious and rampant piracy problems occurring over their networks today.”

“Technology,” Glickman continued, “is handing us the opportunity to deal the first real body blow to online piracy, to begin to reach toward the day when we might be able to take it off the table and debug the system.”

Don’t forget: technology has handed us so much more than just getting a few free tunes or the occasional movie. I’m not going to list the thousands of ways in which technology has at least changed (and many people argue, improved) our lives, but folks in charge of the MPAA or the RIAA or the SAC have to understand that they can either catch up or get out of the way. Continuing to fight an already beleaguered public will only piss people off.

However, that’s really not what’s at issue here. What folks in the industry seem to be arguing is this: we need a multi-tiered web access platform that people will pay for at the higher levels in order to at least monetize those folks who are downloading information en masse. As the author of the article points out, this has a severly negative impact on well-funded and insightful organizations that carry original content. Making people pay for this content would be like making people pay for the air they breath.

Category: DRM issues, media, Music Industry | Tags:

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