Excited Delirium News Summary – January 2012

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‘Excited Delirium’ was a busy topic in January, this time with some people questioning the wacky science behind it.  Here are some of the headlines:

Excited delirium‘ finding in custody death angers parents
The Guardian
Despite not being listed by either the Department of Health or the World Health Organisation as a recognised cause of death, excited delirium has been cited
Nadeem Khan: A case of excited delirium?
Bureau of Investigative Journalism
I don’t think it was ‘Excited Delirium‘ something else happened and contributed to his death. I understand that he needed to be restrained but not in the
How ‘excited delirium‘ is being used to explain unexpected deaths
100gf | Politics and Computers
But while some experts warn that ‘excited delirium‘ is not a satisfactory explanation for a death, it seems the term is becoming increasingly common in both
Unproven science used to ‘explain’ deaths in police custody
Bureau of Investigative Journalism
Excited delirium‘ or ‘sudden-in-custody-death-syndrome’ is a niche diagnosis He said: ‘Excited delirium is a way of offering an excuse on behalf of the
Analysis: Too many deaths, too little accountability
Bureau of Investigative Journalism
The untimely death is explained in ill-defined medical terms – the prisoner was suffering from ‘excited delirium‘ – a term that the World Health
Eight cops cleared in death of man at Denver Zoo
Denver Post
Ashley likely had used cocaine within the previous 24 hours and could explain why his behavior exhibited behavior consistent with “excited delirium.
Pathologist, autopsy report shine light on jail deaths
Monitor
Many forensic experts classify Palomo’s mental state as excited delirium, a state of mind brought about by the use of cocaine in which the person feels

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