A Summary: Harper and His Packed Senate

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I can’t get this quote out of my head in context of the Senate issues that Harper continues to duck:  “every douchebag needs a cu**” (you fill in the blanks and you decide who’s who).

It’s crude, but I personally feel it’s appropriate given the intense corruption that follows Stephen Harper everywhere.

Here’s the recap:

Stephen Harper was – and still is – a power-hungry maniac.  To get to power, he used every tool in his Swiss Army Knife collection of political manipulation, especially media manipulation of the public.

When Duffy and Wallin were key figures in the private media (aka not CBC), I’m willing to speculate that all kinds of verbal promises of Shangri-La were made at the time in exchange for convincing the public that Stephen Harper really should be the next Canadian Prime Minister.  Both hit a home run during several elections, persistent in their efforts to tell us that Stephen Harper and his gang of Harris rejects were the greatest thing since sliced bread.

And they were partially successful, handing Harper a minority.

Once in power, albeit tenuous, bucketloads of cash were spent on private media networks, especially in Ontario and Quebec, in the form of advertising the Canadian Economic Action Plan (and other programs) as a financial reward for mindlessly endorsing the Conservatives, despite the fact that the Cons still had very little of the popular vote.

They – the Conservatives in power – then quickly mobilized their forces to ensure that political patronage appointments hit an all-time high in Canadian history to ensure that, should Canadians figure out Harper right away, the Cons still would have poisoned the waters so that partisan politics would continue for decades.

Of course, these appointments included the lush headquarters of the Senate, where a pile of Conservatives – particularly losers in multiple elections, but also those master media manipulators – made their new, comfy, red-carpeted homes (amongst several other homes, it seems).

With our money, the Harper regime was able to get the networks to continue to manipulate the public to a point where they were able to win a majority, especially in Ontario.

Next Steps:  Abolition of Dilution of Power and Consolidation of Power

I am now convinced that these appointees have a single mission:  destroy the credibility of the Senate.

This is an important next step in consolidating Harper’s power even further.  A Senate is an important body in a bicameral, democratic system because it offers a way to dilute power from any other single body.

Without the Senate, all of that power would become instantly concentrated right into the hands of the PMO.

So, what do I think about the ‘Senate Scandal’?  I think it’s been manufactured from day one to convince Canadians that it’s not an important institution.  More importantly, a loathsome institution, full of reprobates and crooks, at least according the great manipulators in the PMO.  They’re right on cue with the message that it should be reformed, aka the grassroots Reform Party so that they can continue to manipulate Canada’s antiquated first-past-the-post voting system, where majority governments are made with a fraction of the vote.

And what do I think about the people that are complaining about their democratic rights when they were appointed and not elected by an autocratic dictator?

Boo hoo.  You sold your credibility down the river and you took the prize.

Now you’re left with nothing and I feel nothing for you.  Stop your whining and either get on with it or show us the paperwork that proves you weren’t spending Canadian taxpayer dollars promoting the Conservative Party of Canada while doing dozens of trips to Ontario ridings under the guise of professional speaking engagements.

Not possible?

Expose the entire plan.  Bring the Conservatives down for once and for all.

Not willing to do that?  Then suffer the consequences of a full, retroactive glove-snapping audit because you deserve it.

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