Category Archives: china

Excited Delirium Book: Chapter 62 (888 Tremors) – reposted

Author’s Note: The following is Chapter 62 of the my online book "Excited Delirium". Please post comments. Please tell your friends about this story. If you’ve missed a chapter, please click here for Chapter 1 (Prelude) or here for the full index .

August 7, 2008

Those with very little experience with Chinese culture, but with significant influence in the West – people like Griffith Garamond – make accusations that the Chinese are unable to innovate. People like Garamond have lead themselves to believe that this mass of population exists to serve the West.

The common suggestion is that intellectual property related to operating system software is stolen and repackaged on a regular basis, or that goods that are normally manufactured in North America are copied and redistributed elsewhere in Asia and Europe at substantially lower prices, exchanging quality and value for a lower price and undermining the economic benefit for the original manufacturer that would like to keep a lock on the distribution of its products. Continue reading

Excited Delirium Book: Chapter 64 (The Great 08 Quake)

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Author’s Note: The following is Chapter 64 of the my online book “Excited Delirium”. Please post comments. Please tell your friends about this story. If you’ve missed a chapter, please click here for Chapter 1 (Prelude) or here for the full index .

The vague and distant tremors felt in Beijing might have been mistaken for a train rushing through town. Or joyous celebrations in a stadium packed to the brim with people watching a football game. Or maybe even a low angry growl of a feril dog that had not been fed, warning passersby to stay away.

These were the trepid and barely noticeable rumblings that would bring forth what would soon be known as the “Great ’08, the Quake that Altered the World”.

The 20th century has seen more significant natural disasters than any other century. Some even say combined. It’s because of this escalation in nature’s wrath against mankind that many religious leaders and sects claim that we are approaching what they call the “End Days”. To these people, these are the times when God, Shiva, Allah or even Fenrir come to molest and devour everything that we know because we’ve molested and devoured everything that they’ve given us. The term for this belief is ‘eschatology’ and it’s a prevalent and doom-ridden ideology that has accelerated the end of our world out of a sense of carelessness and negligence. Continue reading

Excited Delirium Book: Chapter 63 (Sasha Pigeon’s Funeral)

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Author’s Note: The following is Chapter 63 of the my online book "Excited Delirium". Please post comments. Please tell your friends about this story. If you’ve missed a chapter, please click here for Chapter 1 (Prelude) or here for the full index .

Sasha Pigeon would have taken great pleasure in knowing that his wake was the same day as the start of the Olympics in China. Unfortunately, this day would also live in the memories of billions around the globe as a day of horror, a day of shock and the day on which the world changed forever.

August 8, 2008 would live in the genetic history of humankind forever, like the Kennedy assassination or the intentional destruction of the Twin Towers at the World Trade Centre.

Sasha Pigeon had always loved the opening ceremonies of the Olympics. The euphoric sense of celebration. The repetition of the ‘peace and love’ message that permeated the conflicting sense of competition. The elaborate over-the-top staging and drama that was designed to outdo the previous activity. The open ceremonies seemed to him like a few hours of watching a live version of ‘Fantasia’. Continue reading

Wal-Mart: Deciding the Fate of the 2008 Presidential Race?

Wal-Mart fears a Demoractic win. They will be crippled if anyone comes to power and they might actually show a hint of being sympathetic towards the labour movement in the US.

In this article by the Wall Street Journal (do not accept the certificate), it is suggested that Wal-Mart is rallying managers and executives to ‘encourage’ employees to be mindful of the cost of unionization. While they’re putting on airs that they are not telling employees how to vote in the next Presidential election, I wouldn’t be surprised to see more stories like the one above as the election process heats up.

I also wouldn’t be surprised to see Wal-Mart spend a massive amount of money on advertising as the campaigns rev up.

Why? I seem to recall in 2004 that Wal-Mart had a rediculous volume of GRPs during the 2004 election. They even had a brand called … you guessed it … "George". Here’s their "George" logo:
Wal-Mart George

Is that a little "WB" in the "O" of "George"? Why would they need that? Was this brand launched during the 2004 election season with the express reason of trying to get American voters to constantly think of George WB?

Your guess is as good as mine, but I can’t wait to see what they try to pull during the 2008 election.

P.S. I didn’t realize that Wal-Mart is America’s largest private retailer, but it makes perfect sense. I also appreciated the chart showing unionized labour in America over the last 20 years. Can we get a chart that co-relates that with the growing gap between the rich and poor in Canada and the US?

US Unionization Trends

Excited Delirium Book: Chapter 62 (888 Tremors)

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Author’s Note: The following is Chapter 62 of the my online book "Excited Delirium". Please post comments. Please tell your friends about this story. If you’ve missed a chapter, please click here for Chapter 1 (Prelude) or here for the full index .

August 7, 2008

Those with very little experience with Chinese culture, but with significant influence in the West – people like Griffith Garamond – make accusations that the Chinese are unable to innovate. People like Garamond have lead themselves to believe that this mass of population exists to serve the West.

The common suggestion is that intellectual property related to operating system software is stolen and repackaged on a regular basis, or that goods that are normally manufactured in North America are copied and redistributed elsewhere in Asia and Europe at substantially lower prices, exchanging quality and value for a lower price and undermining the economic benefit for the original manufacturer that would like to keep a lock on the distribution of its products.

The stark reality is that these accusations fail to prove inability to innovate. The reality is that those in China see things quite differently.

Imagine a world without a compass, printing, paper, gun powder, the abacus (the world’s first computer), the cast iron plow or paper money.

Not possible? Thank the Chinese. These and many more inventions came from the Chinese as they expanded their knowledge base while the West wallowed in the Dark Ages. Continue reading