Tag Archives: CRTC

Canada’s Media Future: Just Make Stuff Up

Posted on by 1 comment

In a recent interview with Media Matters, a Fox insider admitted that they would routinely ‘make stuff up’ in the wake of mounting pressure from managers and owners, but also to cope with rising costs associated with actually investigating and reporting on a story before making it public.

Media activities and publishing or broadcasting in Canada face the same future.

With the prospect of the CRTC approving the ability for journalists to essentially lie to the Canadian public, we’ll get more stories like this:

For the first few years it was let’s take the conservative take on things. And then after a few years it evolved into, well it’s not just the conservative take on things, we’re going to take the Republican take on things which is not necessarily in lock step with the conservative point of view.

“And then two, three, five years into that it was, we’re taking the Bush line on things, which was different than the GOP. We were a Stalin-esque mouthpiece.  It was just what Bush says goes on our channel. And by that point it was just totally dangerous.  Hopefully most people understand how dangerous it is for a media outfit to be a straight, unfiltered mouthpiece for an unchecked president.”

Imagine a future in Canada where Stephen Harper has a station like Sun TV to repeat everything that they say, verbatim.  Lies will be spread about the evils of women working, the sins and depravity of homosexuality and the top 10 reasons why we should kill anyone that describes themselves as a socialist.

Intolerance will be the future of this country.

Stop the CRTC now and do what you can to demand truth in journalism.

Unfortunately, if the CRTC fails to ignore the public (which it probably will), it will prove yet again that this institution is nothing more than an industry mouthpiece and that it’s useless to the average Canadian citizen.

#UBB Overturned

Posted on by 2 comments

It seems the Canadian internet using public can breath again … for the moment.

The Conservative government has overturned the CRTC decision to allow Usage Based Billing.  Is it because the implementation of UBB would have been seen as one of the largest indirect taxes on Canadians and their businesses since the introduction of the personal income tax in 1917?

Or … is it because the Cons realize that pissing off an entire nation to satisfy the endless greed of Bell and Rogers just may not be a good idea?

Regardless, don’t expect the issue to go away.  The folks with Canada’s media companies are slippery and creative.  Too bad all that energy is being wasted on finding ways to tax Canadians and not on ways to improve our digital infrastructure!

I’m going to start lying now … because the CRTC says I can

Posted on by 2 comments

This update from Michael Geist speaks to the CRTC decision to modify their rules concerning false or misreading news.

In effect, what is says is that the CRTC will now allow our media companies and broadcasters to lie to the general public, assuming that no one gets hurt in the process.

They are lowering their standards when standards don’t need to be lowered.  Did you call the CRTC and ask for permission to lie to the public?  How about your friends and family members?  Did they request more lies with their vitriol?

September 1, 2011 will be a sad day for the Canadian public as this will be the intended day for implementing these new ‘dumbing down’ rules.

It’s crap like this that makes most Canadians believe that the CRTC should be scrapped.  It’s nothing but a Con and large media mouth piece.

To voice your disgust with this change, submit your comments here:

https://services.crtc.gc.ca/pub/instances-proceedings/Default.aspx?Status=Open&PubArea=Brd&PubType=All&PubSubType=All&lang=eng

Scroll to the bottom and click on Notice # 2011-14.

It’s unlikely that your comment will be heeded, but it might make you feel better.

Boycotting Quebecor: Avaaz.org Petition to CRTC

Posted on by 1 comment

Avaaz.org has started a petition to encourage the support of Konrad von Finckenstein, head of the CRTC, to prevent ‘Fox News North’ (a subsidiary and entity managed by Quebecor Media Inc) from launching in Canada.

However, please also remember that an effective petition against Fox (and supporting the CRTC) should also include a boycott of Quebecor Media Inc, all subsidiaries and the companies that advertise on their sites.

Please spread the word that Canadians will not tolerate the abuse of media that QMI, Quebecor, Sun Papers, Canoe and other subsidiaries impose on us every day and that they will bury us with if Fox News North goes live in the coming months.

CRTC TV Feedback Opportunity

Posted on by 0 comment

With all things related to feedback to our government, you should take things with a grain of salt.

That said, the CRTC is encouraging feedback on local TV issues, fee-for-carriage and other problems related to our broadcasters.

The link is here.

A summary of my basic feedback:  we can do better (to steal an oh-so inspirational line from Iggy).

The details:  We can leverage the power of the Internet and user interaction to create content that will rival anything developed in the international community.  We have many different, diverse voices in this country and all we seem to get is watered down and outrageously expensive pablum from the US.

Our broadcasters have been lazy, boring and dull for decades.  More frustrating for the country’s progressives:  they’ve been spewing biased vitriol for years under the guidance of Herr Harper and they are actively ruining our sense of democracy by taking our taxpayer dollars in the form of propaganda for the Harper Regime or for slagging the opposition leaders.

Unfortunately, now that they face a little competition, they’re running to the CRTC with their hands out begging for cash, whining about how the big bad Internet is stealing their business.

Conclusion:  if you don’t want to pay for local content, pull the plug.  Cancel your cable subscription (or satellite).  If you want local content, plug in to what your friends and peers are saying on social networks online.