Tag Archives: tar sands

The High Cost of the Truth …

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In a World Filled With Deceit

The Conservatives and their well-oiled, well-bought media machine have latched on to Thomas Mulcair’s telling of the economic truth about the Tar Sands and, like true parasites, they are not about to let go until they’ve bled him to death.

Last week, Thomas Mulcair correctly reminded Canadians that we are suffering from what’s known as ‘Dutch Elm Disease’, a loose economic term that refers to how demand for a popular commodity will destroy other parts of the economy that rely on a competitive or more balanced exchange rate between trading partners.

A thorough Wikipedia article has been created over time and numerous articles are available online.  If you’re in the media, go and educate yourself and read up a little before tearing more strips off those who tell the truth.

Despite the intellectual precedent and discussion about the problem, the absolute tyrannic and sycophantic response from the Conservatives and the media prove how far they’ve gone to the ‘dark side’ of the Tar Sands and oil reliance in this country.

In fact, the Conservatives, especially Stephen Harper who pretends to be an economist, should be well aware of this economic condition and yet continue to play dumb.

It’s safe to say that TRUTH in this country is no longer allowed to exist.

Of course, the best to react:  change the rules.  The NDP should make sure that the Wikipedia post is properly updated to reflect Thomas Mulcair’s comments for a start.  They should also start a contest to create a new ‘Canadianized’ name for the problem.

You Can’t Nationalize Carbon Costs

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Whether you’re in the carbon credit market or the car or you’re simply looking for ways to generate revenue, it’s not a good idea to think of a carbon tax as a solution, even though some Canadians think it might be the only way to go.

Why?

It’s morally absurd to nationalize (or localize) carbon costs when the local government might be hosting the producers of carbon, but they’re not reaping all of the benefits.

Allow me to explain …

Say you’re a big country with a whole pile of natural resources.  Let’s remind everyone that very few of these natural resources are actually currently owned by the people of that country.

And let’s say that in order to produce, export and consume those products, people already pay an excise tax that is designed to simply extract cash from the pockets of those people to pay for things that they may or may not want, like crappy jets and useless prisons.

And let’s finally agree that the corporations that extract these resources are already getting a free ride because they pay a minimal amount of royalties, all of which are deductible against absurdly low corporate income taxes, most of which are negative because of the vast array of ridiculous writeoffs that we create for these welfare slobs.

And now … we introduce a carbon tax on the people that might use the carbon-based products that non-Canadian companies overcharge us for.

What an insult.

It’s time we got the formula straight.

I will pay carbon taxes when I know that the companies like Shell, BP and Exxon pay a flat tax to the people of Canada for the privilege of extracting our resources.

Until then, adding another tax to Canadian citizens is just another insult to our pocket books and will do nothing – I repeat nothing – to solve the environmental tragedy known as the Tar Sands.

Harper Govt Says FU To Environment

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The Harper government just eliminated funding for one of Canada’s largest and most durable environmental groups, the Canadian Environmental Network.

Talk about a thrust to the jugular for the environment.

Meanwhile, several billion a year get pissed away on the Tar Sands …

Ugh.

MayDay 2011: Tar Sands, Energy & Oil Subsidies

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Canada wastes several billion PER YEAR subsidizing the creation, expansion and mechanization of the Tar Sands in Alberta, all so that we can export billions more in Dirty Oil to the United States.

It’s a failed strategy when it comes to energy development, storage and transfer in this country.

It must change.

Any government other than a Stephen Harper Government (TM) would eliminate these subsidies.

I’m not alone with this opinion on this industry.  The New York Times Editorial ran a post on how Americans need to say “No” to the Tar Sands.  The original text of this article is pasted below.

So far, only the Green Party and the NDP have come out swinging against the Tar Sands, while the Liberals show luke-warm support for change in this area.

The dreaded ‘Carbon Tax’ policy announcement will never be made before May 2 by anyone, with the exception of Stephen Harper, who will bitch endlessly about how the Liberals and the NDP will bring about a tax on oil in the future if you vote for them.

While Stephen Harper continues with his platform of FEAR FOR CANADA, we need to elect a government that will put an end to the shame that Canadians feel when it comes to this outdated mode of energy production.

Later this year, the State Department will decide whether to approve construction of a 1,700-mile oil pipeline from Canada to the Texas Gulf Coast called Keystone XL. The underground 36-inch pipeline, built by TransCanada, would link the tar sands fields of northern Alberta to Texas refineries and begin operating in 2013. The department should say no.

State is involved because the pipeline would cross an international boundary. Secretary Hillary Rodham Clinton first said she was “inclined” to support it, but has lately sounded more neutral. An environmental assessment carried out by her department last year was sharply criticized by the Environmental Protection Agency for understating the project’s many risks. The department has since undertaken another environmental review that will soon be released for public comment. It needs to be thorough and impartial.

Advocates of the Keystone XL, which include the Canadian government, the oil industry and its allies in Congress, argue that a steady supply of oil from a friendly neighbor is the answer to rising oil prices and turmoil in the Middle East. But the Energy Department says the pipeline would have a minimal effect on prices, and there is already sufficient pipeline capacity to double United States imports from Canada.

The environmental risks, for both countries, are enormous. The first step in the process is to strip-mine huge chunks of Alberta’s boreal forest. The oil, a tar-like substance called bitumen, is then extracted with steam or hot water, which in turn is produced by burning natural gas. The E.P.A. estimates that the greenhouse gas emissions from tar sands oil — even without counting the destruction of forests that sequester carbon — are 82 percent greater than those produced by conventional crude oil.

The project poses a major threat to water supplies on both sides of the border. Turning two tons of tar sand into a barrel of oil requires four times as much water as producing a barrel of conventional oil. Operations in Alberta have already created 65 square miles of toxic holding ponds, which kill migrating birds and pollute downstream watersheds, a serious matter for native communities.

In the United States, the biggest potential problem is pipeline leaks. The Keystone XL would carry bitumen — which is more corrosive than crude oil — thinned with other petroleum condensates and then pumped at high pressure and at a temperature of more than 150 degrees through the pipeline.

Last July, an older bitumen pipeline in Michigan spilled 800,000 gallons of the stuff into the Kalamazoo River. A new TransCanada pipeline that began carrying diluted bitumen last year has already had nine spills.

The Keystone XL would cut diagonally across Montana and the Nebraska Sand Hills — a delicate region of porous, sandy soils — to northern Kansas before heading south to the Gulf. It would also cross the Ogallala Aquifer, a shallow underground reservoir of enormous importance for agriculture that also provides drinking water for two million people. A pipeline leaking diluted bitumen into groundwater could have disastrous consequences.

For this reason, Senators Mike Johanns and Ben Nelson of Nebraska have vigorously opposed the planned route of the Keystone XL. Still, political pressure to win swift approval has been building in Congress. Moving ahead would be a huge error. From all of the evidence, Keystone XL is not only environmentally risky, it is unnecessary.

MayDay 2011: At Least Someone Will Make Money Off The Tar Sands

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The EU announced earlier this week that it will begin to price Canadian oil from the Tar Sands ‘differently’ than other energy products and sources.

In effect, the EU is putting a tariff on our oil since we’re not willing to control and take responsibility for this issue ourselves.

This is great news for the EU though:  they’ll be making billions off our oil.

And we don’t under a Conservative regime.

What an awesome plan!  What’s next?  Letting someone sell our water for a profit?