Category Archives: oil

When Will Stephen Harper Take Credit for Cheap Gas?

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The collapsing oil price has some analysts wondering if the Tar Sands glut will ever end, taking the fortunes of the Conservative Party of Canada and Stephen Harper with them.

The only true positive out of Stephen Harper’s reign of error has been the collapse in prices at the pumps.

For most of the country the price was about $1.20 to $1.35 (or higher) as early as the beginning of 2015.  While prices were slow to slide, they eventually tanked to less than $1.00 in most parts of the country.

This is exceptional news for most commuters, as we pay for gas in some form or other, be it for our own cars or the vehicles that transport us from A to B.

Stephen Harper is a seasoned expert when it comes to avoiding any responsibility, even though he apparently is the leader of this country.

However – and unfortunately for all of us – it won’t be long before Stephen Harper starts taking credit for changes in gas prices, claiming some kind of ‘genius’ for it’s impact on Canadian consumers – especially those in Eastern Canada – and ‘putting more money into the hands of Canadians’.

We know that about 60-70% of the country will understand it’s complete tripe.  Now … what about the other 30% of the population that still laps up his crap?  Will they wake up in time to realize that they’re being lied to?  Will they finally wake up to the miserable reality that is a Stephen Harper Conservative government and take their vote elsewhere?

The High Cost of the Truth …

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In a World Filled With Deceit

The Conservatives and their well-oiled, well-bought media machine have latched on to Thomas Mulcair’s telling of the economic truth about the Tar Sands and, like true parasites, they are not about to let go until they’ve bled him to death.

Last week, Thomas Mulcair correctly reminded Canadians that we are suffering from what’s known as ‘Dutch Elm Disease’, a loose economic term that refers to how demand for a popular commodity will destroy other parts of the economy that rely on a competitive or more balanced exchange rate between trading partners.

A thorough Wikipedia article has been created over time and numerous articles are available online.  If you’re in the media, go and educate yourself and read up a little before tearing more strips off those who tell the truth.

Despite the intellectual precedent and discussion about the problem, the absolute tyrannic and sycophantic response from the Conservatives and the media prove how far they’ve gone to the ‘dark side’ of the Tar Sands and oil reliance in this country.

In fact, the Conservatives, especially Stephen Harper who pretends to be an economist, should be well aware of this economic condition and yet continue to play dumb.

It’s safe to say that TRUTH in this country is no longer allowed to exist.

Of course, the best to react:  change the rules.  The NDP should make sure that the Wikipedia post is properly updated to reflect Thomas Mulcair’s comments for a start.  They should also start a contest to create a new ‘Canadianized’ name for the problem.

You Can’t Nationalize Carbon Costs

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Whether you’re in the carbon credit market or the car or you’re simply looking for ways to generate revenue, it’s not a good idea to think of a carbon tax as a solution, even though some Canadians think it might be the only way to go.

Why?

It’s morally absurd to nationalize (or localize) carbon costs when the local government might be hosting the producers of carbon, but they’re not reaping all of the benefits.

Allow me to explain …

Say you’re a big country with a whole pile of natural resources.  Let’s remind everyone that very few of these natural resources are actually currently owned by the people of that country.

And let’s say that in order to produce, export and consume those products, people already pay an excise tax that is designed to simply extract cash from the pockets of those people to pay for things that they may or may not want, like crappy jets and useless prisons.

And let’s finally agree that the corporations that extract these resources are already getting a free ride because they pay a minimal amount of royalties, all of which are deductible against absurdly low corporate income taxes, most of which are negative because of the vast array of ridiculous writeoffs that we create for these welfare slobs.

And now … we introduce a carbon tax on the people that might use the carbon-based products that non-Canadian companies overcharge us for.

What an insult.

It’s time we got the formula straight.

I will pay carbon taxes when I know that the companies like Shell, BP and Exxon pay a flat tax to the people of Canada for the privilege of extracting our resources.

Until then, adding another tax to Canadian citizens is just another insult to our pocket books and will do nothing – I repeat nothing – to solve the environmental tragedy known as the Tar Sands.

Feeding Our Cars

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You know we’re at a crossroads in our future when more is spent to feed our cars than the people on this planet.

The Gazette shares this update recently and discloses that more corn is now used to create ethanol than to feed livestock.

Now, this might be because more livestock is being grass-fed (ie. naturally) as opposed to being stuffed with a product that they aren’t naturally supposed to eat, but the more realistic prospect is that we’ve pushed demand for hybrid fuels to stupid levels because of bad planning and design on behalf of our auto manufacturers.

This is the first time since the dawn of the use of domesticated animals that we’ve allowed this change to happen.

Which brings me back to a term that I created a while ago:  euthanol.  Definition:  the generation of a product that effectively starves most of the planet for the benefit of a select few.

MayDay 2011: The Last 24 Hours

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I doubt I’ll be able to sleep tonight.

There’s still so much that I would love to expose about the lies Stephen Harper has been telling over the last 6 weeks (and decade or so as well), but I won’t.  There are so many projections, ideas, concepts and so on that I’d love to explore, but I’ve run out of time … and energy.

As the last 24 hours tick down, I’d like to thank all of the readers that have put up with my rants and who have contributed to the blog over the course of the election (and prior to this as well as those who might even continue to hang on).

I also want to beg everyone that has the slightest desire to push Canada into a sustainable future to VOTE.  Progressives outweigh conservatives in this country by a margin of at least 2 to 1, and it’s critical that you vote, vote strategically and vote early on because it’s going to be crowded!

Finally, I’d like to apologize to Stephen Harper for many direct and personal attacks and for insinuations that the Conservative Party of Canada is not a viable option in this election.  But hey … as long as you remain the lying politician that you are and members of your cabinet and other MPs remain suspect in their dealings with Canadian funds and the trust of voters, I’ll keep it up and completely retract anything I’ve said if I’m proven wrong.

Until then, I’ll remind all readers why we’re having this election:  YOU CAN’T BE TRUSTED.

In time, I’ll recover from this election and return to writing fiction and discussing my preferences, which are trashing mainstream media and crapping on poor economic policies that we take.

My expectation is that after tomorrow night, the latter will take a backseat because WE WILL WIN.

We will win this election.

We will win Canada back.

We will win the democracy and leadership that we expect from our politicians.

We will win back what we as citizens, taxpayers, children, grandparents, mothers, fathers, sons, daughters, uncles, aunts and all other relations deserve to win.

We will win our future.

We will win our internationally credibility.

We will win a clean and safe environment.

WE WILL WIN.

P.S.  My prediction for the election outcome is that we will elect an NDP minority government that’s a coalition with the Liberal Party.  My guess is that we’ll have about 110 NDP seats with 40 Liberal seats.  The Conservatives will be left with about 120 seats, most of which will come from Ontario and Alberta.  30 or so seats will be up for grabs.  The Bloc will be devastated, but might squeak out 15-20 seats.

As the fallout from the election sinks in, Gilles Duceppe, Stephen Harper and Michael Ignatieff will announce their retirement from their parties.

Elizabeth May will retire if she doesn’t win, but I am confident that the good people in Saanich-Gulf Islands will make the right decision for all of Canada and elect someone that will push for Proportional Representation and democratic reform in Canada.