Tag Archives: Green

Canada’s Only Hope: An Orange-Green Merger

Igantieff bullied his way to the top.

  • The result:  the Federal Liberals are lower in the polls today (23%) than they were under Dion’s ‘peak’ (26%).
  • The result:  the ‘progressive’ contingent of the Liberal Party of Canada looks to be prepared to take a walk.

The Green Party of Canada AND the NDP are gaining on Canada’s ‘traditional’ parties.

  • The result:  combined, the Green and NDP represent more than 29% of decided voters.  This is a far cry from the 37% that the Cons currently register, but if you were to look at the numbers by riding (which I don’t have), I’m willing to bet that the combined impact would lead to a much higher polling in valuable urban ridings than the Conservative base of rural locations.
  • The result:  it’s conceivable that if an election were held today, the NDP might hold as many seats as the Liberals.

What does this all mean?  The Greens and the NDP MUST drop their gloves, get together, agree on their differences and lead this country into the future.

Let’s face it:  there are only 3-4 central issues that separate the two parties.  We must encourage all of the representatives from both parties to do the following:

  1. Show the door to the leaders of the NDP and the Greens.  I will never vote for the NDP again as long as Jack Layton is in charge, and I think millions of Canadians feel the same way.  He delivered a minority government to Stephen Harper, not once but TWICE.  He has kept this man in power and he has blood on his hands.  Elizabeth May has drifted unsuccessfully to three different ridings in the past and has not chosen winnable ridings.  More importantly, it’s been about Elizabeth May and not the Green Party of Canada in the last three elections.
  2. Get together.  Talk.  Write.  Set up a wiki.  Find your differences and put them aside.  You’ll find that you have more in common than you have keeping you apart.
  3. Create solid, consistent and unique policy.
  4. Pick a single leader with dozens of talented people to support him/her.
  5. Win seats.

With Ignatieff’s Liberals about to implode and the Harper Conservatives poised to make impromptu visits to Geneva to defend their war crimes in Afghanistan, there’s no time like the present to respond to all Canadians with a progressive platform.

It’s that simple.  We need action today, so lobby your local MPs, candidates and the leaders of these two parties.

Canada’s future depends on it.

How Canada’s Divided Left Can Get it Right

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Ron Love, organizer of the ‘United Alternative’, explains in this article how his efforts to unite the right paid off in 2000 and how they continue to pay off as Stephen Harper comes closer and closer to a majority government.  He shares his wisdom for the ‘left’ and demonstrates what ‘we’ need to do in order to mount a force that could oppose the ‘right’.

Read it.  Digest it.  Critique it.

And then you’ll realize that his basic premise couldn’t be more wrong .

My guess is that the ‘left’ probably won’t subject itself to the same kind of ham-fisted tyrannical forces that the right did.  What allowed the right to unite is that they had common ground that could arguably be found outside the political spectrum, such as religious dogma.  As a result, their basic political program (that which they revealed to Canadians in their public platform) was easily agreed upon by all of the founding members.  Examples:  neo-con economic policies (including disclosure of what they would do if they had a majority, like sell off public assets and allow banks to merge), tough on crime policies and money for defense.  The ‘Progressive’ part of the Conservatives disappeared.  Even Mulroney looks like a socialist compared to some of the ex-Harris brown shirts.

The challenge for the ‘left’ is that we have become the ‘bucket’ for everything that the Conservatives are not.  Green.  Socialist.  Marijuana Party.  Liberals.  Without speaking for anyone else, I feel that putting such a divergent range of political viewpoints into a single ‘bucket’ would destroy my sense of democracy.

Someone like Ron Love might argue that the ‘left’ would need to find a steady middle ground as we face media pressure and scrutiny, but I think that can only lead to failure because so many opinions and views would be left scattered at the perimeter.

Here’s an example:  right now it looks like Michael Ignatieff is the front-runner for the Liberals.  He has brow-beat every socialist and person with a cause into voting Liberal already and I would NEVER vote for the man if he lead a coalition group of progressive parties.  His views are just marginally left of Harper and if it were up to him, we’d be in Iraq today shooting babies.

More importantly, this viewpoint doesn’t reflect the Long Tail of politics, where everybody should be able to have an opinion and these opinions are negotiated (however long it takes) rationally in a legal setting, such as the House of Commons.

At the core of my opposition to this kind of ‘ramming of the right’ comes the notion that people need to be able to express their point of view and they need to do it within a democratic framework.  The Harper campaign has and continues to focus on leadership.  A single person.  Anything else would be tantamount to anarchy.

So, Mr. Love, you’re wrong to assume that progressive voices in Canada want to be silenced or marginalized into a single voice.  We represent an orchestra.  A choir.  All singing different parts, hopefully in great harmony.

In the short-run, this would take shape as a coalition that represented a balance of progressive opinions.  It would take the form of many people making many educated and informed decisions, with a lot of discussion taking place.  In public and not behind closed doors.

The long-run it’s Proportional Representation where the single angry voice of the right is muted by the rising swell of an entire chorus.